Matarazzo, Salonen Named to SLA Hall of Fame

Pair Will Be Inducted During SLA Annual Conference in Boston

Alexandria, Virginia, 28 May 2015—An academic librarian with a longtime interest in corporate libraries and a corporate information professional with experience in academia will be honored for their service to the Special Libraries Association at the organization’s annual meeting next month in Boston.

James Matarazzo, dean and professor emeritus at the School of Library and Information Science at Simmons College in Boston, and Ethel Salonen, president of SLA in 2004-2005 and currently head of information services at MITRE in Bedford, Massachusetts, will be inducted into SLA’s Hall of Fame during the awards ceremony at the SLA 2015 Annual Conference. The conference will host approximately 2,000 librarians, information professionals, and industry vendors at the Boston Convention Center on June 14-16.

The Hall of Fame is reserved for SLA members at or near the end of their active professional careers and recognizes distinguished service and contributions to SLA or an SLA chapter or division. The Hall of Fame was established in 1959 and typically receives no more than three new inductees each year.

About Jim Matarazzo
A member of SLA since 1964, Jim has served on the association’s board of directors and on its Research and Strategic Planning Committees, chaired a task force on the value of the information professional, and served two terms as president of the Boston Chapter (now the New England Chapter). He was named a Fellow of SLA in 1988, received the SLA Professional Award in 1983 and again in 1988, and was given the SLA President’s Award in 1991.

Although he officially retired from Simmons in 2002 after more than four decades on the faculty (including 14 years as assistant dean of the library school and 9 as dean), Jim continues to teach courses on his favorite topic—the organization and management of corporate libraries. He has written extensively about the value of corporate libraries and has been a frequent consultant to business executives on the development of corporate libraries and information centers and the management of corporate knowledge.

Jim is the author of several books, including Closing the Corporate Library: Case Studies on the Decision-making Process (1981), and the co-author (with Toby Pearlstein) of Special Libraries: A Survival Guide (2013). He continues to be published frequently in library journals—in 2014 alone, he co-authored articles about the salaries of special librarians in the United States, the forces influencing the future direction of corporate libraries, and the value of information literacy training in organizations.

Jim earned his library degree from Simmons College and received a doctorate from the University of Pittsburgh School of Information. He is vice president and secretary of the H.W. Wilson Foundation, which provides financial assistance to organizations that support libraries and library-related causes.

About Ethel Salonen
Equally comfortable in corporate and academic environments, with experience in sales and sales management as well as information access and analysis, Ethel has used her wide-ranging expertise and broad perspective to effect far-reaching changes within SLA.

While serving as president, Ethel oversaw the launch of a professional development campaign, with a goal of raising $1 million in donations. She also led successful initiatives to restructure member dues, implement electronic voting, and synchronize the association year with the fiscal year.

In addition to serving as president, Ethel served on the SLA Board of Directors from 1993-1996 and has held leadership roles in the Boston Chapter, the Leadership and Management Division, the Knowledge Management Division (she is the 2015 chair), the Corporate Libraries Metrics Task Force, and the Strategic Realignment Committee, among others. Prior to joining MITRE in 2005, she worked at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, the University of California at Riverside, Arthur D. Little, Inc., KPMG LLP, Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Dialog Information Services, and Primark Financial Information Division.

Ethel received her library degree from C.W. Post College/Long Island University. Although a native of Manhattan, she has a fondness for nature and has visited all of the major national parks in the United States and Canada.

About SLA
The Special Libraries Association (SLA) is a nonprofit international organization for innovative information professionals and their strategic partners. SLA serves information professionals in more than 60 countries and in a range of working environments, including business, academia and government agencies. SLA promotes and strengthens its members through learning, advocacy and networking initiatives. For more information, visit sla.org.

Contact:
Stuart Hales
+1.703.647.4919
shales@sla.org

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